THE EDGE 96.1
Beats That Move You

Now Playing:

Loading...
Listen on

"Someone Will Die": Former MAFS Star's Attack On The Show

A former Married At First Sight star Clare Verrall has slammed the show, claiming that "someone is going to die" as a result of featuring on it.

Clare, who appeared on season two of the show in 2016, will reveal "the very dark side" of the reality program in an exclusive interview with Channel 7's Sunday Night this weekend.

In a newly-released trailer, the former reality star says: "I just wanted a love story and I thought this was that way it was going to happen. I didn’t sign up to have my life completely ripped to shreds."

She adds: "Someone is going to die. That someone was very nearly me."

Clare Verrall was reportedly suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder before appearing on the program after being attacked the year prior.

The reality show 'experts' matched her with Jono Pitman, who the Herald Sun allege was ordered to complete an anger management course after assaulting a man in a 2008 bar brawl. 

"I was very disappointed that, knowing my history of PTSD after a violent attack and knowing I had joined the show earnestly trying to put myself out there to find love, the show and psychologists partnered me with someone who had known anger management issues and who has been arrested for violent behaviour," she told the publication.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Clare Verrall (@clareverrall) on

Post show, Clare claims she experienced regular panic attacks, and attempted suicide twice. 

"Immediately after we finished filming, I began to struggle. I was breaking down during the show," she told Daily Mail Australia.

"After we stopped filming, I was in bed for about a month so I was just full of anxiety. As soon as I went outside there were panic attacks, stuff like that. It was unfortunate.

"Then, after it aired, I had a total meltdown and basically stayed in bed for a month."

The former MAFS bride took to Instagram to explain her decision to speak out on the program.

"I have to admit, I’m so anxious for this to screen as I know I’m going to be raked over the coals again by trolls,” Verrall wrote.

"I didn’t say anything bad about my match Jono as he, like me was just one of their puppets. I earnestly wish him nothing but happiness.

"My beef is with @channel9 as the situation they put us both into was very damaging, particularly for me as I went on the show right after a experiencing a major trauma, resulting in me developing PTSD which they were aware of.

"I want to get the message out though that as these shows become more & more SUPER-SIZED, the absolute lack of duty of care for the cast all in the name of ratings is horrific.

"Viewers should know that as soon as the network have made their money from you, the network simply kicks you to the kerb leaving you to scramble around in the dirt, trying desperately to piece your life back together."

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Clare Verrall (@clareverrall) on

Clare Verrall wants to raise awareness of the impact reality shows have on contestants' mental health.

"What will it take for Australia to wake up to what we are watching & therefore supporting?" Verrall wrote.

"Does someone have to die first???

"I only agreed to do this rather intimidating interview so people can get a peek behind the fake glitz into the very dark side of some ‘reality TV’ shows and decide if they want to continue to support having these shows like this on the air."

If you or anyone you know is suffering from anxiety or depression, call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

Share this: