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The Dark History Of Australia’s Amusement Park Rides

The death of four people at Dreamworld on Tuesday adds another page in the dark history of Australia’s amusement park rides.

Kate Goodchild, 32, her brother Luke Dorsett, 35, his partner Roozbeh Arahi, 38, and another unnamed woman were killed after their Thunder River Rapids vessel flipped on the ride’s conveyor belt.

Dreamworld has since closed indefinitely as authorities investigate the tragic accident.

It’s the first ride-related death at the Gold Coast theme park since it opened in 1981.

Many commentators have been quick to point out that the ride was considered one of the ‘safer’ options by park goers in comparison to the other ‘thrill seeker’ rides.

However, history shows that it’s not always the heart-stopping rides that have been deadly.

Since 1968 there have been 11 deaths, not including Tuesday’s fatalities, at Australia’s amusement parks and shows.

Most recently, in 2014 eight-year-old Adelene Leong was killed after being thrown from a high-speed ride at the Royal Adelaide Show.

A year earlier in 2013 a five-year-old boy was seriously injured after being flung from the Frizbee ride at a school fete in Highfields, Queensland.

An eight-year-old girl was killed and 11 others injured in 2001 when an inflatable carriage broke free from a ride at a carnival in Kapunda, South Australia.

In 2000, 37 people were hurt at the Royal Adelaide Show when the Spin Dragon ride collapsed and dropped a 4.3 tonne gondola onto queuing riders.

An 11-year-old girl was killed and two boys were injured three years earlier in 1997 when a carriage from the Octopus ride broke free and fell to the ground at the Rylstone Show near Mudgee in NSW.

In one of Australia’s most notorious accidents, six children and one adult died when the Ghost Train at Sydney’s Luna Park caught fire.

It came just two months after 13 people were injured on the park’s Big Dipper ride after a steel runner came loose on the rollercoaster.

In 1968 at the Royal Hobart Show a high-wire stuntman, Adrian Labans, 44, fell to his death during a high wire act.

Staff Writers with AAP; Photo: AAP Stock Image

MORE: Daughter Flung From Dreamworld Ride That Killed Mother

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